Fantastic Fruit Dip Make Super Summer Snack

Fabulous Fruit DipSometimes a good way to enjoy fresh fruit is with a dip.  Fruit makes a great snack so whip up this Fantastic Fruit Dip and keep in the refrigerator to snack on any time of the day.  Of course, I am partial to strawberries but when peaches and nectarines are in season, they top my list.  And, if you have young ones around, bananas are always a hit.

Fantastic Fruit Dip from Eating Well Through Cancer

Makes 16 (2-Tablespoon) servings

1 (7-ounce) jar marshmallow creme
1 (8-ounce) package reduced-fat cream cheese
1 Tablespoon grated orange rind
2 Tablespoons orange juice

1. In mixing bowl, beat together marshmallow crème, cream cheese until smooth. Stir in orange rind, orange juice.
2. Refrigerate until time to serve, serve with your fruit of choice.

Nutritional information per serving: Calories 78, Protein (g) 2, Carbohydrate (g) 11, Fat (g) 3, Calories from Fat (%) 36, Saturated Fat (g) 2, Dietary Fiber (g) 0, Cholesterol (mg) 10, Sodium (mg) 71, Diabetic Exchanges: 0.5 other carbohydrate, 0.5 fat

Check out more healthy easy cancer recipes.

 

Eating Well Through Cancer Kindle and Nook Version Now Available: Includes New Recipes


No Stir Risotto For those thast like to use your kindle or nook, I have my new updated kindle version of 
Eating Well Through Cancer.  This version of the book was made exclusively for kindle to make the information easy to download, easy to read, and easy to prepare with photos.  The book includes information, new recipes, tips; all to help you during this challenging time.  Also, available at B&N, Nook, Eating Well Through Cancer

 

 

 Kindle version: Eating Well Through Cancer

Nook version:  Eating Well Through Cancer

Eating Well Through  Cancer Kindles

 

 

 

Table of Contents

  • Day of Chemotherapy
  • Neutropenia
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Sore Mouth or Throat
  • High Calorie-High Protein
  • Snacks and Light Meals
  • Caregiver
  • Healthy Eating Post Treatment

A Note on the Recipes
✦ The nutritional analysis provided for each recipe is based on the larger portion size listed.
✦ Although most of the recipes in this book have diabetic exchanges, not all recipes are appropriate for diabetics unless they have a “D”. Follow your doctor’s recommendations.

There is so much information on cancer prevention; however, my focus is on what you can eat when you have cancer.  There are foods that are better tolerated and ease the symptoms while going through treatment.  As author of the book, Eating Well Through Cancer, I can give you easy nutritious everyday recipes to feed the family when you experience the various side effects.  My common sense approach to cooking makes this a book everyone can use.  Food is comfort, energy, and nutrition, but what you eat can make a difference in how you feel.

From a spring brunch, to caregiver help or what to enjoy most when you have a sore mouth, you will recognize these pantry-friendly time-friendly recipes.  I can give tips, guidance and information regarding food and cancer.

Chicken Tortilla Soup for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

DSC_1306I teamed up with the good folks at WBRZ this week to highlight some of my favorite recipes for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. This Chicken Tortilla Soup is in the caregiver chapter of my Eating Well Through Cancer book as it makes a deliciously warm comfort food to take to a friend or loved one that is undergoing treatment to fight cancer. The book is also now available as an eBook for your Ipad, Kindle or other device. In the doctor’s note for this recipe it adds that tomatoes are high in lycopene, and Vitamins A and C and that Vitamin C promotes healthy gums and teeth, aiding in iron absorption and wound healing.  Check out more information about my cancer book, And, if you are looking for the perfect PINK GIFT, any friend will have fun with Too Hot in the Kitchen

 

Chicken Tortilla Soup
A one pot popular and really tasty version of southwestern chicken soup.

Makes 8 (1-cup) servings

1 onion, chopped
1 teaspoon minced garlic
4 cups low-sodium, fat-free chicken broth
1 (28-ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon ground cumin
2 tablespoons lime juice
1 (16-ounce bag) frozen corn
2 cups shredded skinless Rotisserie chicken breast
Tortilla Strips (see recipe)
1 cup shredded reduced-fat Cheddar cheese
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1 small avocado, peeled and diced, (optional)

1. In large pot coated with nonstick cooking spray, sauté the onion and garlic until tender, about 5 minutes.
2. Add chicken broth, tomatoes, chili powder, cumin, lime juice, corn and chicken. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer about 15 minutes, time permitting.
3. Serve with tortilla strips (see below), cheese, green onion, and avocado, if desired.

Nutritional information per serving:
Calories 345, Protein 31g, Carbohydrate 40g, Fat 7g, Calories from Fat 18%, Saturated Fat 3g, Dietary Fiber 5g, Cholesterol 57mg, Sodium 791mg Diabetic Exchanges:
2.5 lean meat, 2 starch, 2 vegetable

Terrific Tip: Topping with cheese adds both protein and calories to your meal.

Nutrition Nugget: A dish your whole family will enjoy. Tomatoes are high in lycopene, and Vitamins A and C. Vitamin C is a member of the antioxidant family of vitamins. Vitamin C promotes healthy gums and teeth, aiding in iron absorption and wound healing.

Tortilla Strips

6 (8-inch) flour tortillas (use corn tortillas for gluten-free option)

1. To make tortilla strips, while soup is cooking, preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Cut tortillas into 1/2-inch wide strips. Coat baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray and lay strips over sheet. Bake 15-20 minutes or until lightly browned. Strips may be stored in zip lock bags.

Gingerbread Muffins

Gingerbread muffins plate 4

Light and fluffy, this muffin has all of the flavor of your favorite spiced cookie in this moist anytime snack or breakfast muffin. Keep some muffins in the freezer to pop out when not feeling well and need a boost. Ginger has been shown to help nausea symptoms so these muffins may be just the ticket to feeling better. This recipe actually comes from my Eating Well To Fight Arthritis book which makes the perfect pink present this month.

Makes 20 muffins

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 cup sugar
1/3 cup canola oil
1 cup molasses
2 eggs
1 cup boiling water
2 teaspoons baking soda

1. Preheat oven 325°F. Coat muffin pans with nonstick cooking spray or line with papers.
2. In large bowl, combine both flours, ginger, cinnamon, and cloves. Set aside.
3. In medium bowl, whisk together sugar and oil. Add molasses and eggs whisking until blended. In glass measuring cup, combine water and baking soda. Stir to dissolve. Pour in egg mixture and whisk until blended. Add egg mixture to flour mixture, stirring just until combined.
4. Spoon batter into paper lined tins, filling 1/2-3/4 full. Bake 20- 25 minutes or until inserted toothpick comes out clean.
Nutritional information per serving:
Calories 161, Calories from Fat 25%, Fat 5g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 19mg, Sodium 140mg, Carbohydrates 28g, Dietary Fiber 1g, Total Sugars 14g, Protein 2g, Dietary Exchanges: 2 starch, 1/2 fat

Quick Veggie Soup: Cancer Comfort Food

Quick Veggie Soup

Cold weather seems to go hand and hand with cold and flu season. Aside from washing your hands and stocking up on Vitamin C, there’s nothing like a warm bowl of soup to fight away the chills. My recipe for Quick Veggie Soup from Eating Well Through Cancer is the perfect crowd-pleasing vegetarian option. Loaded with vegetables and light on fat, this trim soup will fill everyone up without weighting them down. It’s easy to put together on those nights where you want to put a nutritious meal on the table, but you’re short on time. Also, the soup freezes well, so consider doubling and freezing for another cold night. To cut down prep time even more, substitute a package of frozen mixed vegetables for the carrots, corn, and peas.

Quick Veggie Soup from Holly Clegg’s Eating Well Through Cancer: Easy Recipes & Recommendations During & After Treatment

6 servings/serving size: 1 cup

1 onion, chopped
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 (16-ounce) can no-salt-added tomato puree
4 cups water
Salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon  Worcestershire sauce
1 cup  sliced carrots
1/3 cup white or brown rice
1 cup frozen corn
1 cup frozen  green peas

1. In large nonstick pot coated with nonstick cooking spray, sauté onion and garlic 5 minutes or until done.

2. Add tomato puree, water, salt and pepper, Worcestershire sauce, carrots, and rice. Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, 20–25 minutes or until rice is done.

3. Add corn and peas and continue cooking 10 minutes or until heated. Remove bay leaf before serving. If needed, add more water to soup.

Nutritional information per serving: Calories 129, Calories from fat 5%, Fat 1 g, Saturated Fat 0 g, Cholesterol 0 mg, Sodium 95mg, Carbohydrate 29 g, Dietary Fiber 4 g, Sugars 9 g, Protein 5 g, Dietary Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 carbohydrate

Check out more cancer recipes

Cream of Spinach Soup

Cream of Spinach Soup

Cream of Spinach Soup

Craving soup? This Cream of Spinach Soup from my cancer cookbook  is full of vitamin and minerals as well as a good source of fiber to help keep bowels regular. Serve it as a light meal or pair with a salad or sandwich a heartier lunch or dinner. It’s a one pot dish for easy clean up and freezer friendly as you can make ahead and pull it out of the freezer for an easy meal, quick!

Cream of Spinach Soup from Eating Well Through Cancer  

Frozen broccoli can also be used for a broccoli soup version. For soup craving, here’s an easy idea. Soups are enjoyed any time of day and freeze well.

Makes 8  (1-cup) servings

1/2 pound fresh mushrooms, sliced
1 small onion, chopped
2 (10 3/4-ounce) cans reduced-fat cream of mushroom soup
1 3/4 cups canned fat-free chicken broth or vegetable broth
2 (10-ounce) packages frozen chopped spinach, cooked according to  package directions and drained well
Salt and pepper to taste

In large pot coated with nonstick cooking spray, sauté the mushrooms and onion until tender over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add the soup, chicken broth, spinach, and salt and pepper, stirring until thoroughly heated. Transfer to a food processor or blender to purée.

Nutritional information per serving
Calories 76, Protein (g) 4, Carbohydrate (g) 11, Fat (g) 2, Cal. from Fat (%) 24, Saturated Fat (g) 1, Dietary Fiber (g) 3, Cholesterol (mg) 3, Sodium (mg) 700, Diabetic Exchanges: 0.5 starch, 1 vegetable, 0.5 fat

DOC’S NOTES:
Mushrooms are a good source of B vitamins, copper and other vitamins. Spinach is a good source of vitamins and rich source of Beta Carotene, protein, and folacin. Folacin is important in the synthesis of DNA, which controls cell function. Folacin acts with B12 to produce red blood cells.

For more Eating Well through Cancer recipes visit www.hollyclegg.com

 

Cheesy Shrimp Rice Casserole

Cheesy Shrimp and Rice Casserole

Cheesy Shrimp and Rice Casserole

Need a simple but delicious meal full of flavor? When Neutropenia is an issue, try Cheesy Shrimp Rice Casserole, as it will really be a family favorite. This is a low bacteria dish so it’s great when your white blood cells low. With a just a few quick ingredients you can keep in the pantry at all times – you will have a palate-pleasing recipe.

Cheesy Shrimp Rice Casserole from Holly Clegg’s Eating Well Through Cancer cookbook.

A palate-leasing plain recipe.

 

Makes 6 – 8 Servings

1 cup dry brown or wild rice

2 cups water

2 pounds cooked medium shrimp, peeled

Salt and pepper to taste

6 ounces light pasteurized processed cheese spread

1/2 cup skim milk

Bread crumbs

 

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Cook rice in water according to package directions. Set aside.

2. Combine shrimp, salt and pepper, and cooked rice. Heat cheese and milk together in microwave or in small pan over medium-low heat until melted, and mix with rice mixture.

3. Transfer to 2-quart casserole dish, sprinkle with bread crumbs, bake 15 minutes or until well heated.

 

Nutritional information per serving

Calories 250, Protein (g) 30, Carbohydrate (g) 21, Fat (g) 4, Cal. from Fat (%) 15, Saturated Fat (g) 2, Dietary Fiber (g) 1, Cholesterol (mg) 230, Sodium (mg) 601, Diabetic Exchanges: 5 very lean meat, 1.5 starch

 

DOC’S NOTES:

A single salad and this casserole is a complete meal. For sore mouth, finely chop shrimp.

 

For more Recipes on Eating Well through Cancer visit www.hollyclegg.com

Creamed Double Potatoes

Double Potatoes

Double Potatoes

Who doesn’t love potatoes? When you have a sore throat or mouth try this smooth and creamy dish – a different take on mashed potatoes, with Creamed Double Potatoes. Easy to tolerate when you are not feeling well, and will give you a dose of vitamins and fiber, as well.

 

Creamed Double Potatoes from Eating Well Through Cancer cookbook

Sweet potatoes are rich in Beta Carotene and vitamins. This will be easy to tolerate and you are getting valuable nutrition.

 

Makes 8 Servings

 

1 3/4 pounds baking potatoes

1 3/4 pounds Louisiana yams (sweet potatoes)

3 tablespoons butter

1/3 cup skim milk

2 tablespoons honey

 

1. In large pot, cover both types of potatoes with water and boil 40 minutes or until tender. Peel potatoes and place in mixing bowl with butter, blending until smooth.

2. Gradually add milk and honey, beating until creamy.

 

Nutritional information per serving

Calories 240, Protein (g) 4, Carbohydrate (g) 47, Fat (g) 5, Cal. from Fat (%) 17, Saturated Fat (g) 1, Dietary Fiber (g) 5, Cholesterol (mg) 0, Sodium (mg) 74, Diabetic Exchanges: 3 starch, 1 fat

 

DOC’S NOTES:

Potatoes are rich in Vitamins B6, C, iron, magnesium, niacin, and potassium. Sweet potatoes provide Vitamins A, B6, and C.

 

For more Recipes on Eating Well through Cancer visit www.hollyclegg.com

 

 


Berry French Toast

Berry French Toast

Berry French Toast

Your days of chemotherapy can be tough enough. There is no need for extra work as Berry French Toast is a make- ahead breakfast everyone will enjoy. Use your favorite – berries fresh or frozen and enjoy this incredible version of French toast. Not only is it delicious but the berries provided a good source of Vitamin C and Potassium!

Berry French Toast from Eating Well Through Cancer cookbook

Use whatever fresh berries you can find or pull them out of the freezer and enjoy this incredible version of French toast. Try using whole grain bread.

 

Makes 8 Servings

 

5 cups mixed berries (strawberries and blueberries, etc.)

1/4 cup sugar plus 1 tablespoon sugar, divided

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 large egg

4 large egg whites, beaten

1 cup skim milk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 (16-ounce) loaf French bread, sliced in 1-inch slices

 

1. Preheat oven 350°F. In an oblong 2-quart casserole, put berries, 1/4 cup sugar, and cinnamon.

2. In large bowl combine egg, egg whites, milk, and vanilla. Add bread and soak 5 minutes turning half way through. Arrange bread in one layer over berries. Sprinkle with remaining sugar.

3. Bake 25 – 30 minutes or until bread is golden. Serve with berry juice and berries.

 

Nutritional information per serving

Calories 253, Protein (g) 9, Carbohydrate (g) 48, Fat (g) 3, Cal. from Fat (%) 10, Saturated Fat (g) 1, Dietary Fiber (g) 4, Cholesterol (mg) 27, Sodium (mg) 396, Diabetic Exchanges: 0.5 very lean meat, 2 starch, 1 fruit

 

DOC’S NOTES:

Breakfast foods can be eaten in the morning or evening. The berries provide a good source of Vitamin C and potassium, and fiber is in relatively good supply, too.

 

For more Recipes on Eating well Through Cancer visit www.hollyclegg.com

 

 

Who doesn’t love potatoes? When you have a sore throat or mouth try this smooth and creamy dish – a different take on mashed potatoes, with Creamed Double Potatoes. Easy to tolerate when you are not feeling well, and will give you a dose of vitamins and fiber, as well.

 

Creamed Double Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are rich in Beta Carotene and vitamins. This will be easy to tolerate and you are getting valuable nutrition.

 

Makes 8 Servings

 

1 3/4 pounds baking potatoes

1 3/4 pounds Louisiana yams (sweet potatoes)

3 tablespoons butter

1/3 cup skim milk

2 tablespoons honey

 

1. In large pot, cover both types of potatoes with water and boil 40 minutes or until tender. Peel potatoes and place in mixing bowl with butter, blending until smooth.

2. Gradually add milk and honey, beating until creamy.

 

Nutritional information per serving

Calories 240, Protein (g) 4, Carbohydrate (g) 47, Fat (g) 5, Cal. from Fat (%) 17, Saturated Fat (g) 1, Dietary Fiber (g) 5, Cholesterol (mg) 0, Sodium (mg) 74, Diabetic Exchanges: 3 starch, 1 fat

 

DOC’S NOTES:

Potatoes are rich in Vitamins B6, C, iron, magnesium, niacin, and potassium. Sweet potatoes provide Vitamins A, B6, and C.

 

For more Recipes on Eating Well through Cancer visit www.hollyclegg.com

Oatmeal Pancakes Cooking for Children with Cancer-St. Jude Walk

Oatmeal Pancakes

Oatmeal Pancakes

I had the privilege of working with Jenee’ Bourgeois and her daughter, Anna James, who is having treatment at St. Jude.  They approached me to create recipes that would entice children undergoing treatment to eat.  There are foods that are better tolerated and ease the symptoms while under treatment, however, we do want the kids to eat for strength and their well-being too.  If you aren’t familar with St Jude, it is a wonderful insititution that I feel fortunate to donate too.  My book, Eating Well Through Cancer, includes some of the recipes I featured for the paper and then I had some kid-friendly recipes that maybe could include the kids in the ktichen. Here’s one of my recipes I prepared and you can check the article for the fun presentation.

You can help too with the St. Jude’s walk on Saturday, November 19th and the website is www.givethankswalk.org and the St. Jude website is www.stjude.org.

Here’s my Otameal Pancake recipes and you can check out more recipes in “Holly Clegg Adapts Recipes For Children”

Oatmeal Pancakes
Keep these pancakes in the freezer and pop them into the microwave for a quick breakfast. The whole wheat flour boosts the fiber and adds a nutty flavor and you can always add chocolate  chips and serve with sliced bananas.

16 servings/serving size: 1 pancake

1 cup old-fashioned oatmeal
2 cups buttermilk
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 egg
2 egg whites
3 tablespoons light brown sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking powder

1. In large bowl, combine oatmeal and buttermilk, let stand 2 minutes. Beat in oil, egg, egg whites, sugar and vanilla.
2. In small bowl, combine flour, cinnamon, baking powder, baking soda. Add dry ingredients to oatmeal mixture, stirring just until combined.
3. Heat nonstick skillet coated with nonstick cooking spray over medium heat. Using 1/4 cup batter per pancake, cook pancakes 1-2 minutes on each side or until lightly browned.

Nutritional information per serving
Calories 94, Calories from fat 18 %, Fat 2 g, Saturated Fat 0 g, Cholesterol 14 mg, Sodium 149 mg, Carbohydrate 16 g, Dietary Fiber 2 g, Sugars 4 g, Protein 4 g, Diabetic Exchanges: 1 starch

 

For more Recipes on Eating Well through Cancer visit www.hollyclegg.com

 

Soothing Symptoms Through Food: National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

 

Sweet Potato Chili over Couscous

It’s a pink out! Thanks to the amazing continuous efforts of many breast cancer charities, doctors, treatment centers, patients, survivors, friends and family, the word it out, October is Breast Cancer Awareness month! Pink ribbons and pink products are everywhere. Many companies, such as Lacoste, Stella & Dot, Tory Burch and Nike among many others, have created products with a pink theme in honor of the cause, with a portion of the proceeds going to cancer research.

Another way to lend a hand to someone close to you going through treatment is of course food. I know I’m bias, but food is the best way to warm the heart and help soothe symptoms, aside from medicine of course. Why not help take the pressure off of mealtime and help ease their symptoms by whipping up a nutritious, easy, flavorful meal for your loved one or friend going through treatment.

Ever since my father’s diagnosis in the late 90′s, I’ve realized the power food has on patients as they go through treatment and work to remain healthy in the years following. In 2006, I wrote Eating Well Through Cancer: Easy Recipes & Recommendations During & After Treatment with a local oncologist to help those going through cancer and caretakers cope with the effects of treatment through food. Currently, I’m a monthly contributor to Thrive (Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s monthly publication), Breast Cancer Wellness and the HuffingtonPost.com health channel. My Eating Well Through Cancer recipes have been featured on LiveStrong.com and AOL Healthy Living.com.

Sweet Potato Chili with Couscous

 However, to keep within the pink theme, I want to offer you a delicious recipe from my trim&TERRIFIC Too Hot in the Kitchen cookbook. I recommend selecting fom the “Fill Up with Fiber” section of my book as it will definitely fill everyone up while supplying a great deal of nutritional value. My Sweet Potato Chili Over Couscous is delicious, nutritious, freezes well and feeds a crowd (see below for recipe).  Look for Louisiana Yams for the sweetest of sweet potatoes and I speak from experiencefrom cooking with them.   Remember, sweet potatoes have been touted as one of the most nutritious vegetables which is great as they are my favorite….so is this vegetarian style recipe.

Sweet Potato Chili over Couscous

This vegetarian entrée tops my list! The spicy chipotle chili powder, smoky tomatoes, and naturally sweet yams over unassuming couscous are fantastic.

Makes 6 (1-cup) servings with 1/2 cup couscous

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 red bell pepper, cored and chopped
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon chili powder
1 teaspoon chipotle chili powder
1-1/2 pounds Louisiana yams (sweet potatoes), peeled and cut into 1/2-inch chunks (4 cups)
1 (14 1/2-ounce) can fire-roasted diced tomatoes
1 (15-ounce) can dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
1 1/2 cups vegetable broth 3 cups cooked couscous

1. In large nonstick pot, heat oil and sauté onion, bell pepper and garlic over medium heat until tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in chili and chipotle powder for 30 seconds. Add sweet potatoes, tomatoes, beans and broth.

2. Bring to boil, reduce heat, and cook about 20-30 minutes or until sweet potatoes are tender. Serve over couscous.

Nutritional information per serving:
Calories 312 Calories from fat 10% Fat 3g Saturated Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg Sodium 626mg Carbohydrate 61g Dietary Fiber 11g Sugars 12g Protein 11g Dietary Exchanges: 3 1/2 starch, 2 vegetable

Spicy Advice: Chipotle chili powder has a smoky spicy flavor found in spice section. Fire-roasted tomatoes, also in groceries, have a smoky fiery flavor. Chili powder and diced tomatoes may be substituted to save a trip to the store.

For more Recipes on Eating Well through Cancer visit www.hollyclegg.com